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Leaving Piazza Loggia and walking along Via dei Musei (the former decumannus), you'll soon find yourself in the middle of the ancient Roman town of Brixia. The most remarkable sights include the Capitoline temple at the Forum Romanum and the nearby theatre.

 

Published in Brescia

Present Umm Qais is the site of ancient Gadara, a Hellenistic-Roman ruined city in Northern Jordan that used to belong to the Decapolis, a group of ten cities. Although Gadara cannot be compared to Jerash, it's worth to be visited as well. Highlights of the site include Roman ruins and a mostly intact but abandoned 18th-19th century Ottoman village built on the top of them.

Published in Jerash and the north

Being the best-known of all desert castles in Jordan, this mysterious building has been added to the list of UNESCO World Heritage sites. Is commonly identified as a bathhouse built by Umayyad caliph Walid I (705–715 AD), but nothing is sure about it. Present structures could have belonged to a larger complex out of which only a few foundations remained. What stands today is either identified as a caravanserai or a royal retreat (a hunting lodge) without any military function. If the latter presumption is accepted, then the main building can be an audience hall with a bath attached to it. Inside there are fascinating strange frescoes depicting naked women and other scenes that should be banned in Islam.

Published in Desert castles

Qasr al-Azraq is a well-preserved Roman fortress about 100km east of Amman, one of the frequently visited desert castles. For most visitors, the link to TE Lawrence and the Arab Revolt is the major draw to come here.

Published in Desert castles

Collection of the Archaeological Museum belongs to one of the best in the country, although some artefacts like the famous Dead Sea Scrolls were moved to another museum.

Items exhibited here range from the Neolithic Age to the Ummayad period and span all areas of Jordan.

Published in Amman

Stretching above modern Amman at an altitude of 850 meters, the Citadel is a must for all tourists visiting Amman. It used to be the enormous Acropolis of ancient  Philadelphia, the predecessor of the present city.

Surrounded by 1700m-long walls, this complex was more than just a fortresses above the city, in fact it was a standalone entity within the ancient city. History buffs will say that there are plenty of other, much better preserved ancient fortresses throughout the Middle-East. However this one is still definitely worth to be visited, because it enables visitors to understand how an antique Roman and Byzantine settlement was transformed into an Umayyad city. In other words: this monument is simply a summary of  entire Jordanian history.

Published in Amman

Large megalithic stone blocks, Hittite lion carvings mixed with elements of Greco-Roman architecture – these are the characteristics of an extraordinary and yet controversial building in Iraq-al Amir (Arak-el-Emir ). Nothing is 100% sure about this building except for one thing – there are simply no similar structures not just in Jordan, but also in the entire Middle-East.

Published in Amman

The Roman theatre is a highlight of any visit to Amman. Built during the reign of Marcus Aurelius (169-177 AD), this large and strikingly steep structure has a seating capacity of about 6,000 people.

Published in Amman

Jordanian Museum of Popular Traditions - established inside the restored Roman Theatre - collects Jordanian and Palestinian folk heritage from all over Jordan since 1971. Its aim is to protect and conserve this heritage and to present it for future generations.

Published in Amman

Built in 191 AD, the Nymphaeum was the most majestic fountain in ancient Philadelphia, a two-storey-high complex adorned with statues and various stone carvings.  It is believed to have contained a three meter deep pool with an area of 600 square meters, which was continuously refilled with fresh water. The ancient stream and a Roman bridge stood exactly at the spot where now a busy road runs.

Published in Amman